Pies & Tarts

Roasted Tamarillo Tarte Tartin


Prep Time : 15 + 15 Minutes | Cook Time : 15 + 30 Minutes | Total Time : 3 1/2 hours | Difficulty : Moderate

Hello my lovelies! This recipe started life as a picture I created for Westgold. I got a lot of requests for the recipe so it would be poor form not to share. Pie should be for everyone. This is an all-oven version of a tarte tartin. It’s great for people who don’t have an oven friendly frying pan in a helpful size. Pre-roasting the fruit also helps concentrate the flavour and drive off a little moisture – great for softer fruits. We are using the roughest of home made rough-puff. If you don’t want to faff (and I don’t blame you) use a good quality bought puff pastry. An all-butter puff will have much better flavour. Choose the block rather than the pre-rolled sheets so you can control the thickness of your crust. The pastry in this recipe makes more than you need but it’s hard to make a smaller amount than this. Use up the excess making jam turnovers or brush it with melted butter and sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon before cutting into strips and baking them for spicy fluffy extra treats.

This tarte is on the tart (sorry) side. Too much sugar will catch underneath while the tarte is baking and I err on the side of less sugar with fruit desserts anyway. If your tendency is for a sweeter tooth then drizzle a little runny honey on the warm tarte – it will soak in and add sweetness and flavour.

First up we need to get out pastry underway. The key is to keep everything very very cold. Pop your box grater and a small measuring jug in the freezer while you work on the rest.

Measure the flour into a medium bowl and add the salt.

Measure your butter. If it’s not very hard and cold pop it in the freezer for 10 minutes. Using your very cold grater shred your very cold butter into the flour. Mix it through with your hands.

Now measure the vinegar and water into your very cold jug. Using a tablespoon add a little water at a time to the dry ingredients and gently scrunch everything with your fingertips to bring it together. I usually put 6 tablespoons or so into the dough while it’s in the bowl.

Tip the dough out and see how dry it’s looking. Add the last bit of water by drizzling it over the pile if needed. Now we fold. Imagining your dough is a letter fold it into thirds. It will be a crumbly pile right now but have faith. Fold it into thirds in the crosswise direction from the first time. It will be holding together better now.

 

Pat it down and fold again. You want to rotate 90 degrees and fold 5 or six times altogether. It will be resisting you by now but will look like a neat block.

Pop it into a plastic container (better than plastic wrap that can’t be reused) and put it into the fridge to chill for 30 minutes.

Get the dough out and using a rolling pin this time (fancy!) roll the dough out until it’s about double the size and fold like a letter again. Roll it to laminate the layers and repeat twice more rotating 90 degrees each time.

Chill the dough again for at least an hour before using it for this tarte or something else. While the dough is chilling we can get the tamarillos ready.

Heat the oven to 200C (395F). Cut a cross in the bottom of each tamarillo and put them in a large bowl or jug. Pour boiling water over them to gently blanch and loosen the skins. Leave them to sit for about 5 minutes. If the skins aren’t peeling easily leave them for another few minutes.

Use a small sharp knife to peel back the skins. Cut each tamarillo into 3 slices crosswise.

Melt the butter and mix in the sugar, cinnamon and lemon zest. Spread over the base of a pie plate.

Arrange the tamarillo slices on top. Squish them together. Even if they kind of don’t fit that’s ok. They will shrink a little as they cook. Remember to put them nice side down.

Roast the tamarillo slices for around 15 minutes until a lot of liquid is bubbling around them and they have darkened in colour.

Take the dish out of the oven and use a spoon to ladle off about half of the liquid. We’ll use it later to serve and if we leave it in the pan it will sog up our crust. Pop the dish back in the oven to get piping hot again while you’re cutting out the puff pastry. Roll out your pastry to about 1/4 inch (5mm) thick. Cut out a circle to fit your pie plate with a little excess to tuck down the side of the fruit.

Get the hot plate of fruit out of the oven and set it on a  wire rack. Working quickly lay the pastry over the top and very carefully tuck the edges around the sides of the fruit. Don’t seal it completely – we want steam to be able to get out from underneath.

Put the tarte back in the oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes. You need to let it cook long enough for the pastry to bake all the way through. No soggy middles around here.

Take the tarte out of the oven and let it rest in the pan for a few minutes to let the fruit reabsorb some of the juices. Lay a plate over the top of the pie dish. Hold the edges very firmly using tea towels or oven cloths to help.

 

With the courage of your convictions, quickly flip the dish upside down. Set it down and give the pie plate a little jiggle. You will be able to feel if the tarte is still stuck to the pie plate. Lift the pie dish off. If you have a slice or two still stuck then gently encourage them off and place them back where they go in the tarte.

Drizzle the top with a little honey if you want extra sweetness and serve warm with vanilla ice cream, mascarpone or thick greek yoghurt. Drizzle over the reserved tamarillo syrup from earlier. You can never have too much drizzly goodness..

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Roasted Tamarillo Tarte Tartin


Prep Time : 15 + 15 mins | Cook Time : 15 + 30 mins | Total Time : 3 1/2 hours | Difficulty : Moderate

Makes : An 8-9 inch tarte

Buttery puff pastry baked to perfection and topped with lightly spiced roasted tamarillos.

Ingredients:

For the rough puff:

  • 250 grams all purpose flour
  • 125 grams very cold unsalted butter
  • 1 teaspoon vinegar
  • 1/2 cup (120 mls) ice cold water
  • pinch salt

For the fruit:

  • 5 or 6 ripe tamarillos
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

– If using metric cups, reduce volume measures by 1 tablespoon for every cup of dry or liquid ingredients – 

Equipment:

  • 8 or 9 inch metal pie plate
  • Bowls and spoons
  • Box grater

Directions:

First up we need to get out pastry underway. The key is to keep everything very very cold. Pop your box grater and a small measuring jug in the freezer while you work on the rest.

Measure the flour into a medium bowl and add the salt.

Measure your butter. If it’s not very hard and cold pop it in the freezer for 10 minutes. Using your very cold grater shred your very cold butter into the flour. Mix it through with your hands.

Now measure the vinegar and water into your very cold jug. Using a tablespoon add a little water at a time to the dry ingredients and gently scrunch everything with your fingertips to bring it together. I usually put 6 tablespoons or so into the dough while it’s in the bowl.

Tip the dough out and see how dry it’s looking. Add the last bit of water by drizzling it over the pile if needed. Now we fold. Imagining your dough is a letter fold it into thirds. It will be a crumbly pile right now but have faith. Fold it into thirds in the crosswise direction from the first time. It will be holding together better now.

Pat it down and fold again. You want to rotate 90 degrees and fold 5 or six times altogether. It will be resisting you by now but will look like a neat block.

Pop it into a plastic container (better than plastic wrap that can’t be reused) and put it into the fridge to chill for 30 minutes.

Get the dough out and using a rolling pin this time (fancy!) roll the dough out until it’s about double the size and fold like a letter again. Roll it to laminate the layers and repeat twice more rotating 90 degrees each time.

Chill the dough again for at least an hour before using it for this tarte or something else. While the dough is chilling we can get the tamarillos ready.

Heat the oven to 200C (395F). Cut a cross in the bottom of each tamarillo and put them in a large bowl or jug. Pour boiling water over them to gently blanch and loosen the skins. Leave them to sit for about 5 minutes. If the skins aren’t peeling easily leave them for another few minutes.

Use a small sharp knife to peel back the skins. Cut each tamarillo into 3 slices crosswise.

Melt the butter and mix in the sugar, cinnamon and lemon zest. Spread over the base of a pie plate.

Arrange the tamarillo slices on top. Squish them together. Even if they kind of don’t fit that’s ok. They will shrink a little as they cook. Remember to put them nice side down.

Roast the tamarillo slices for around 15 minutes until a lot of liquid is bubbling around them and they have darkened in colour.

Take the dish out of the oven and use a spoon to ladle off about half of the liquid. We’ll use it later to serve and if we leave it in the pan it will sog up our crust. Pop the dish back in the oven to get piping hot again while you’re cutting out the puff pastry. Roll out your pastry to about 1/4 inch (5mm) thick. Cut out a circle to fit your pie plate with a little excess to tuck down the side of the fruit.

Get the hot plate of fruit out of the oven and set it on a  wire rack. Working quickly lay the pastry over the top and very carefully tuck the edges around the sides of the fruit. Don’t seal it completely – we want steam to be able to get out from underneath.

Put the tarte back in the oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes. You need to let it cook long enough for the pastry to bake all the way through. No soggy middles around here.

Take the tarte out of the oven and let it rest in the pan for a few minutes to let the fruit reabsorb some of the juices. Lay a plate over the top of the pie dish. Hold the edges very firmly using tea towels or oven cloths to help.

With the courage of your convictions, quickly flip the dish upside down. Set it down and give the pie plate a little jiggle. You will be able to feel if the tarte is still stuck to the pie plate. Lift the pie dish off. If you have a slice or two still stuck then gently encourage them off and place them back where they go in the tarte.

Drizzle the top with a little more honey and serve warm with vanilla ice cream, mascarpone or thick greek yoghurt. Drizzle over the reserved tamarillo syrup from earlier. You can never have too much drizzly goodness..

Cook’s Notes:

  • If you can’t get a hold of or don’t like tamarillos, use this method with any fruit you do like. Just adjust the amount of time pre-roasting the fruit to make sure it will be cooked through when your tarte is done.
  • Choose firm dark red tamarillos with clean, unblemished skins. Even if they are a little underripe make sure you choose ones that are all the same level of ripeness so they cook evenly.

 – This tarte is best within a few hours of being made but is a delicious cold pie breakfast the next day – 

© 2018 Wellington Bakehouse. All images & content are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without prior permission. If you want to republish this recipe, please re-write the recipe in your own words, or link back to this post for the recipe.

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6 thoughts on “Roasted Tamarillo Tarte Tartin

  1. I have never seen that fruit before but it looks amazing on a tart tatin. You certainly were brave to make your own puff pastry! And thanks for the tip on getting the block of pastry instead of the sheet. Will keep that in mind next time.

    1. They’re native to South America and made their way here and to Australia – they grow them in california as well but they’re not an American thing (yet)! They’re delicious – tart and a bit savoury and aromatic 😀 yeah it depends what you’re making and the sheets are usually fine but i like a thicker layer of puff for this one!

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